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RainforestAmazon Rainforest

A slice of Amazon aquatic life in Riverhead,Long Island Aquarium’s
Amazon Rainforest exhibit reminds us of our responsibility to our
planet’s environment and animals.

A vast, highly threatened wilderness, the Amazon Rainforest supports the Earth’s greatest diversity of animal and plant life. More than 2,000 species of tropical freshwater fish swim in the streams and ponds that border the winding Amazon River.

Many of these fish, unfortunately, end up as pets, with results that can be seen here. All the fish in this exhibit have been rescued from people who did not have large enough facilities to keep them.

“Winston,” the red-tailed catfish (Phractocephalus hemioliopterus) in this exhibit, was rescued by Long Island Aquarium after he outgrew and broke his owner’s tank.

Similarly, the red pacu (Colossoma bidens) exhibited here are often sold as pets when they are the size of a quarter, but quickly grow to 12 inches, and an ultimate length of four feet.

As you enjoy these magnificent creatures, remember that they belong in the wild, or at a professional Aquarium – not at home.

Amazing, but true
The silver arowana (Osteoglossum bicirrhosum), represented in this exhibit, can actually leap out of the water to snatch insects, birds, and small mammals from low-hanging branches.

Fish Frog